A Death in the Family (part 3)

Thomas knocked on the door. Urgency made him want to rush, but he forced himself to stay calm. There was still time.

The door opened revealing Rebecca behind it. “He followed Julia, just as you said.”

“Good.” Thomas nodded. “Are you ready?”

The glare Rebecca gave him was pure ice. “You have been asking that question far too often lately. Considering how little you’ve told me about what is going on, I think I’ve been very accommodating. The least you could do is stop questioning my competence.”

“Fine. Let’s go.”

Thomas turned to walk toward the stairs and nearly crashed into Jason.

“Where are you rushing off to?”

Jason was his equal in many ways, but too carefree for his own good. Thomas envied him, but resented him, too. He never took anything seriously.

“We are trying to prevent something bad from happening.”

“Such as?”

“No time to explain right now. Maybe later.” Over his shoulder, Thomas called back to Rebecca. “You know where David is?”

“Yes.”

“Good, then…”

“David?” Jason interrupted. “If you’re going to see him, could you give him this?” Jason held out a white crystal that was a little longer than his hand. It glowed brightly.

A feeling of dread spread throughout Thomas. “What is that?”

“It’s the special power crystal you asked me to make for him.”

“Why doesn’t he have it already?”

“Took longer to make than I expected, but it’s done now. Why do you look so upset?”

“Rebecca! Show me where David is. Right now!”

For a moment, Rebecca said nothing. Maybe she was taken by surprise. Maybe she was getting ready to chastise him again. His urgency, however, had boiled over, and there was no time for niceties. David needed that crystal. Now.

“It’s one of Julia’s pocket spaces. An outdoors one. Hard to pinpoint, but use this. It should help.” She handed him a glass vial with a strand of hair in it. “I need it back.”

Thomas nodded and began to focus on the hair. Julia was better at this than he was, but a piece of his target helped make up some of the difference. After a couple of minutes, he had a link to David. Another minute, and a portal opened. He grabbed the crystal from Jason. “Let’s go,” he commanded, and stepped through. Rebecca followed and immediately held out her hand for him to return the vial.

They found themselves in a grassy clearing at night. About fifty feet away, a figure was holding up a hand that was wrapped in flame. It took a moment before Thomas recognized David, but before he could say anything, a creature leapt from the night, wrapped itself around the younger mage, and dragged him to the ground.

A sense of terror knocked Thomas to his knees. He hadn’t been able to find the source of the danger no matter where he looked, and now he knew why. Mage devourers were impossible to detect with magic. Now that it had David, Thomas knew of no way to get it off him. What was worse, he didn’t know how to stop the creature after it was done with his first victim. David was supposed to stop it somehow, but Thomas didn’t know how that might be accomplished. It had something to do with the crystal Jason had made. That he hadn’t given to David.

“Cool.” Jason walked up next to Thomas. He must have come through the portal as well, though Thomas hadn’t seen him arrive. Before Thomas could reply, Jason had snatched the crystal and began walking toward David and the devourer.

“Jason! What are you doing?” Thomas tried to follow him, but couldn’t manage to get back on his feet.

“Probably what you should have asked me to do in the first place.” Jason’s voice was matter-of-fact with no hint of accusation. He kept walking. As he neared the downed mage, the devourer let go of David and immediately sprang at Jason, who didn’t even try to avoid it. The crystal in Jason’s hand began to glow brighter and brighter. The explosion knocked everyone back.

Thomas must have lost consciousness. When he came to, he heard crying from a little ways off. Looking around, he saw Rebecca stirring a few feet away. In his terror and confusion, he had forgotten about her part in this.

“Rebecca. Did you …?”

“Yes. Now quit yelling. My head is killing me.”

Another survey discovered the source of crying. Julia was holding a body in her arms, rocking back and forth. It had to be Jason. He stood and walked over to her. The body had indeed been Jason. There was no sign of the devourer anywhere.

Julia looked up at him, her eyes red from grief. “You did this. You killed him.” He knew that, if she had more control over her emotions, she would have destroyed him then and there. Instead, she turned back to the burnt out husk of the only person she seemed to care about.

Julia and Jason

It wasn’t the sound of the explosion that drew Julia to the building as much as the odor. Some people talk about the smell of rain. This was the smell of magic, and it attracted her to the collapsed structure like a lamp attracts a moth.

Police were on the scene trying to keep people away from the rubble. Their presence suggested that the small house was unaffiliated; otherwise mages would have kept away prying eyes. She would need to avoid them if she wanted to get a closer look.

Several minutes were spent probing the rubble from afar. She was looking for any empty spaces large enough for her to shift into. From what she could gather using spells, the house had been only a single story with a basement. The explosion had occurred on the ground floor and caused it to collapse. While some debris had fallen into the basement, it was largely still intact. For now. Eventually, the damage would cause it to cave in. She doubted that the authorities could act quickly enough to prevent that from happening, which gave her an opportunity for some scavenging. Opening a portal next to her, she shifted into the basement.

The place was nearly pitch black, and dust choked the air. From her pocket, Julia produced a small marble, which began to glow after she muttered a few words.Then she began to search for anything that might have some value.

In one pile of rubble, she found a couple of books that were probably useless, since they were written in the personal code of the mage to whom they belonged. Still, she put them in her pouch anyway, just in case something might be gleaned from them. Mostly the place was just littered with useless debris. The scent of magic was still strong, but she couldn’t identify the source.

After moving a broken wooden beam, she found a crystal, one that stored magical energy. The crystal itself was valuable, and even more so with charge left in it. With hopes she had found a small cache of the things, she dug through the area looking for more. Instead, under chunks of the house, she found a person.

At first, Julia thought he might be dead, but the rise and fall of his chest indicated shallow breathing. He was unconscious and covered in soot and dust. The magic radiating off of him signaled that he had been in the center of the explosion. It wasn’t clear how badly he’d been injured, but she knew he needed some medical attention.

Every instinct she had screamed at her to leave, and she very nearly did. Yet there was something about him… He seemed so helpless, like a small animal injured on the side of the road. He needed help, and no one else was around to offer it.

It was a fantasy, she knew. She was no hero for anyone. And there was nothing special about him. Probably, just another mage whose ego had led to his own destruction. Perhaps he had even done horrible things. Who knew how many people his own self-importance had hurt? She needed to leave. Take what she had found, and let the consequences of his own pride finish him off.

Something stopped her, though. A ridiculous hope that not everyone was a lost cause; that she herself wasn’t so heartless. She wasn’t sure she believed either of those things. However, the moment she let herself consider them, she knew she wasn’t going to leave him.

Clearing away as much of the debris as possible, and before she could reconsider her decision, she opened a portal and shifted them both out of the ruined building and into one of the safe rooms she maintained for herself. Once there, she cleaned him off and tended to his injuries, all the while ignoring the voice in her head screaming at her to leave. His obvious helplessness made a demand on her she didn’t understand and couldn’t ignore.

Days later, when he regained consciousness, she still didn’t understand her own behavior.

He smiled weakly at her, his eyes barely open. “Who are you?”

She ignored the question and went about the tasks she had set for herself.

He tried again. “I”m Jason. I assume I have you to thank for being alive, so thank you.”

“Julia,” she replied. “Don’t think it’s going to be a habit.”

His laugh hurt her as much as it seemed to hurt him. “I hope not. I don’t plan on doing that again.”

That last must have sapped what little energy he had recovered as he slipped unconscious again. For a long time, she stared at this odd mage who seemed completely unconcerned that a stranger had complete control over his well-being. The exchange only served to magnify her confusion.

Late Night Snacks

Jason was sitting alone in the kitchen, a carton of vanilla ice cream on the island in front of him. He would have gotten a bowl, but then he would have had to wash it, so he decided to just eat right out of the container. No one else was around to object.

A door appeared in the middle of the room. It opened, and Julia walked through. After she closed it behind her, the door vanished. Julia was a head shorter than he was and looked younger, though Jason knew that might be a deception. Her long hair was tied back in the usual ponytail. He couldn’t make out the color of her hair and wished he could remember what it was.

“Jason? Why are you sitting in the dark?”

“Don’t need light to eat.”

Julia sighed and turned a light on.

Black! Her hair was black!

Grabbing a box of crackers from a cupboard, Julia sat down on a stool on the other side of the island. “You didn’t want a bowl?”

He just shook his head.

“So why are you up so late?”

Jason looked at his wrist, but there was no watch there. “Is it late?”

Julia sighed again before changing the subject. “So someone new has moved into the house?”

“Did they?”

“Jason! You’re the one who told me about him.”

“Oh right. An elementalist, I believe. I haven’t met him yet.”

“Why did Thomas bring in someone new? This place is already too crowded.”

“I don’t know. Thomas doesn’t tell me why he does things.”

“Yes, he does. You just never remember.”

“That’s probably true,” Jason said with a laugh.

“This place is too crowded.”

“You already said. But how would you know? You almost always stay in your room.”

Julia frowned. “You forget that I helped create all this space. I know when it’s occupied.”

“Yeah. Still, you should get out more.”

“No, thank you.”

Cocking her head a bit as though listening to something Jason couldn’t hear, she hopped down from her stool and summoned a door. “I’ll talk to you later, Jason.”

After the door disappeared, Sarah rounded the corner into the kitchen. “Jason? I thought I heard Julia.”

Jason waved his hand at nothing. “She just left.”

“Dammit. Why does she always do that?”

“Do what?”

“Leave. She really doesn’t like me, does she?”

“Don’t take it personally. She doesn’t like anyone.”

“She seems to like you just fine.”

“I’m her brother; she has to like me.”

“But you’re not her brother! You two aren’t related.”

“Really?” Jason appeared genuinely puzzled.

“Really. You both say that, but you aren’t.”

“Huh. Well, maybe I remind her of her brother.”

“Honestly, Jason, I don’t know how you make through the day sometimes.”

Jason shrugged. “I don’t think there’s a trick to it.”

“Uh huh.” Sarah slumped down onto the same stool Julia had recently occupied.

Jason looked down at his ice cream, which had become rather soft, and decided he’d had enough. He threw the spoon into the sink and put the carton back in the freezer.

“So have you met David yet?”

“Who’s David?” Jason asked, absently.

“The new kid. He arrived yesterday.”

“Oh. No, I haven’t seen him. Is he nice?”

“As far as I can tell.”

“Don’t worry about Julia. She’ll come around eventually.”

“How do you know?”

“I don’t.”

“Seriously, how do you get through the day?”

“With a smile.” Jason pulled a pretzel rod from… somewhere and put it in his mouth like a cigar. “Have a good night, Sarah.”

“You too, Jason.”

Introducing The Cabal

Staring straight ahead, his eyes were pitch black. Rather than the table and chairs in the room, he only saw the patterns of power criss-crossing the room. The lines were the color of magik and extended beyond the walls. In several spots nearby, the lines clumped together, smelling of fate and fortune. With effort, he could divert power to or from someone, changing the shape of fortune surrounding him or her.

One of the bundles near him, on the same floor of the house they all shared, caught his attention. Fate suggested a great success was close. To get a better view, he drew power from the pattern to strengthen his own sight. There was nothing malicious in his actions; curiosity was simply stronger than anything even remotely resembling common sense. Fate tipped from almost certain success to failure.

After, he continued to study the patterns. Most of his time was spent this way. It was possible to learn, to uncover secrets by careful observation of the various patterns. Mostly, however, he just enjoyed watching them. A knock at the door interrupted him.

“Jason! Get out here!”

He blinked twice to return his vision to normal. Even then it took a few more seconds to adjust to seeing the mundane world. Meanwhile, the pounding on the door continued.

“Jason! Dammit! Open this door!”

He couldn’t remember why they called him ‘Jason.’ It wasn’t his name. On the other hand, he couldn’t remember his actual name, so he didn’t object. The man outside his door looked familiar. And angry.

“David?” He thought that was correct.

“You were doing that thing again, weren’t you? Remote viewing, or some such?”

“Of course. What else would I be doing?”

“Normal research, perhaps?”

“Why?”

“You messed up my incantation again. It had been proceeding just fine until you showed up.”

Another member of their cabal arrived. Sarah? That sounded right.

“What is going on? You guys are making quite a racket out here.”

“Jason messed up one of my projects. Again. I need to move rooms.”

Sarah shook her head. “Can’t. The reconstruction work has put a premium on space. And you’re the newest resident of the house.”

“This is intolerable.”

“Well, if you don’t like it, you can leave.”

He wasn’t really listening to the two of them. Instead, his eyes had blinked black again, and he was studying the bundle of power that was David. It was fluctuating wildly.

“Don’t go, David. Your fortuned doesn’t look good if you leave.”

“What are you talking . . .”

Sarah placed a hand on David’s arm to stop him. “Jason’s warnings should always be taken seriously. He may be difficult, but he isn’t often wrong.”

David fumed silently for a moment before capitulating. “Fine. But quit watching my lab!”

“Oh. Of course. I’m sorry. I didn’t realize I was bothering you.” With that, he closed the door and went back to his chair.

In the hall, David’s anger deflated. “Will he really stop? It can’t be that easy.”

Sarah laughed. “He’ll stop. Until he forgets. You might have a day or two. Use it wisely.” She turned and walked back to her own room, leaving David to mutter curses under his breath.